The Legendary Georgetown Coach John Thompson, Dies.

John Thompson.

Legendary Georgetown coach John Thompson Jr, also known as “Big John” throughout college basketball, has died at age 78.

John Thompson, who led the Georgetown Hoyas basketball team for 27 seasons, has died, according to a Washington, D.C., radio station.

Thompson’s death was reported first by The Team 980 & 95.9FM.

Thompson, 78, compiled a coaching record of 596-239, and 97% of his players stayed all four years and left with a college degree. He was the first Black head coach to win the NCAA national championship when the Hoyas defeated the University of Houston Cougars in the 1984 NCAA title game.

Thompson, who led Georgetown to the 1984 national championship, built the program into a juggernaut, taking the Hoyas to three Final Fours in the 1980s while also winning seven Big East titles and leading the 1988 United States national team to a bronze medal in the Olympics.

His coaching legacy includes the recruitment and development of four players in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame: Patrick Ewing, Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo and Allen Iverson.

“This is a person that, when I came to college — I was 18 — helped me to grow,” Ewing, the current Georgetown coach, said during Big East media day last October. “Even though my mom and dad were always there, he was always a person I could pick up the phone and call if I had a problem or if I had a question.”

Thompson retired from coaching in 1999. During his tenure at Georgetown.

Thompson was born and raised in Washington, D.C. At Archbishop Carroll High School, he emerged as a standout center, playing in three consecutive city championship games. During his senior year, Thompson led Carroll to a 24–0 record, preserving its 48-game winning streak along the way.

Never afraid to speak his mind, Thompson walked off the court in 1989 before a game against Boston college

to protest Proposition 48, an NCAA measure that would ban academically ineligible freshmen from receiving scholarships. Thompson said he protested because he believed the proposition aimed to limit opportunities for minority students.

“I’ve done this because, out of frustration, you’re limited in your options of what you can do in response to something I felt was very wrong,” Thompson told The Washington Post that day. “This is my way of bringing attention to a rule a lot of people were not aware of — one which will affect a great many individuals. I did it to bring attention to the issue in hopes of getting [NCAA members] to take another look at what they’ve done, and if they feel it unjust, change the rule.”

Born Sept. 2, 1941, Thompson starred for Archbishop Carroll High School in Washington before leading providence to the 1963 NIT championship and serving as captain for the school’s first NCAA tournament team in 1964.

Thompson was born and raised in Washington, D.C. At Archbishop Carroll High School, he emerged as a standout center, playing in three consecutive city championship games. During his senior year, Thompson led Carroll to a 24–0 record, preserving its 48-game winning streak along the way.

After graduation, Thompson went to Providence College, where he played on the 1963 NIT Championship team and was part of the first Providence NCAA tournament team in 1964. He was an All-American in his senior year of 1964.

Thompson was drafted in the third round in 1964 and played two years in the NBA for the Boston Celtics.

Thompson then became the head coach at St. Anthony High School in Washington, D.C., from 1966 to 1972, racking up a 122–28 record. He was then hired to become the head coach of Georgetown’s men’s basketball team, where he spent the remainder of his Hall of Fame career.

Over the following 27 years, Thompson’s Hoyas had a .714 winning percentage and ran off a streak of 24 postseason appearances, including a 14-year streak of NCAA appearances from 1979 to 1992 that saw three Final Four appearances in 1982, 1984 and 1985, a national championship in 1984 and narrowly missing a repeat the next year by losing to underdog Villanova.

Thompson won seven Coach of the Year awards.

Timi Olaniyi

Leave a Reply

Next Post

Victim Involved In Portland Shooting Identified By Patriot Prayer Founder.

2 months ago
Few Details have emerged about what took place about a man that was shot and killed in downtown Portland Saturday night, as President Donald Trump supporters clashed with protesters against police. The Portland police haven’t released any information about the victim. The person was shot in the chest, police said. […]
the shoting at portlandthe shoting at portland

Follow

Subscribe to notifications
//azoaltou.com/afu.php?zoneid=2380379
%d bloggers like this: